Therapy Toronto Psychotherapy Definitions

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Neuroplasticity
According to Canadian physician and psychoanalyst Dr. Norman Doidge MD, FRCPC, author of the bestselling book The Brain that Changes Itself, the human brain exhibits is 'neuroplastic'.

This provides considerable hope in the task of living better because it means the brain can - with the right help - change its own internal physical structure.

This enables desirable new behaviours to emerge.


Neuroplasticity, in the natural state, is that property of the brain that allows the brain to change its structure and its function in response to mental experience (including sensing, perceiving, initiating motor action, mental rehearsal, imagining, thinking).

Neuroplasticity is, in the non-natural state, is that property of the brain that allows it to change its structure and its function in response to forms of stimulation (e.g. electrical, magnetic) that turn on the circuits that process natural mental experience. Thus, for example, transmagnetic stimulation can turn on the circuits that process natural mental experience. Thus, for example, transmagnetic stimulation can turn on motor circuits, and thereby facilitate plastic change.
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